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Word Meanings - CONGRESSIVE - Book Publishers vocabulary database

Encountering, or coming together. Sir T. Browne.

Related words: (words related to CONGRESSIVE)

  • COMBER
    1. One who combs; one whose occupation it is to comb wool, flax, etc. Also, a machine for combing wool, flax, etc. 2. A long, curling wave.
  • COMMENDATOR
    One who holds a benefice in commendam; a commendatary. Chalmers.
  • COMPATIENT
    Suffering or enduring together. Sir G. Buck.
  • COMMISSARY
    An officer on the bishop, who exercises ecclesiastical jurisdiction in parts of the diocese at a distance from the residence of the bishop. Ayliffe. An officer having charge of a special sevice; as, the commissary of musters. An officer
  • COMMERCIALLY
    In a commercial manner.
  • COMPOSITOUS
    Belonging to the Compositæ; composite. Darwin.
  • COMMISERATION
    The act of commiserating; sorrow for the wants, afflictions, or distresses of another; pity; compassion. And pluck commiseration of his state From brassy bosoms and rough hearts of flint. Shak. Syn. -- See Sympathy.
  • COMMENSURABILITY
    The quality of being commersurable. Sir T. Browne.
  • COMPASSIONATELY
    In a compassionate manner; mercifully. Clarendon.
  • COMPROMISE
    promise to abide by the decision of an arbiter, fr. compromittere to 1. A mutual agreement to refer matters in dispute to the decision of arbitrators. Burrill. 2. A settlement by arbitration or by mutual consent reached by concession on both
  • COMPENSATOR
    An iron plate or magnet placed near the compass on iron vessels to neutralize the effect of the ship's attraction on the needle. (more info) 1. One who, or that which, compensates; -- a name applied to various mechanical devices.
  • COMPREHENSIVENESS
    The quality of being comprehensive; extensiveness of scope. Compare the beauty and comprehensiveness of legends on ancient coins. Addison.
  • COMPANIONLESS
    Without a companion.
  • COMPARATIVELY
    According to estimate made by comparison; relatively; not positively or absolutely. With but comparatively few exceptions. Prescott.
  • COMFORTLESS
    Without comfort or comforts; in want or distress; cheerless. Comfortless through turanny or might. Spenser. Syn. -- Forlorn; desolate; cheerless; inconsolable; disconsolate; wretched; miserable. -- Com"fort*less*ly, adv. -- Com"fort*less*ness, n.
  • ENCOUNTERER
    One who encounters; an opponent; an antagonist. Atterbury.
  • COMPARE
    To inflect according to the degrees of comparison; to state positive, comparative, and superlative forms of; as, most adjectives of one syllable are compared by affixing "-er" and "-est" to the positive form; as, black, blacker, blackest; those
  • COMPLANATE
    Flattened to a level surface.
  • COMMENDER
    One who commends or praises.
  • COMMUNICATIVENESS
    The quality of being communicative. Norris.
  • INDECOMPOSABLENESS
    Incapableness of decomposition; stability; permanence; durability.
  • INTERCOMMUNION
    Mutual communion; as, an intercommunion of deities. Faber.
  • UNBECOMING
    Not becoming; unsuitable; unfit; indecorous; improper. My grief lets unbecoming speeches fall. Dryden. -- Un`be*com"ing*ly, adv. -- Un`be*com"ing*ness, n.
  • INCOMMENSURABLE
    Not commensurable; having no common measure or standard of comparison; as, quantities are incommensurable when no third quantity can be found that is an aliquot part of both; the side and diagonal of a square are incommensurable with each other;
  • ENCOMBERMENT
    Hindrance; molestation. Spenser.
  • UNCOMMON
    Not common; unusual; infrequent; rare; hence, remarkable; strange; as, an uncommon season; an uncommon degree of cold or heat; uncommon courage. Syn. -- Rare; scarce; infrequent; unwonted. -- Un*com"mon*ly, adv. -- Un*com"mon*ness, n.
  • INCOMPATIBLY
    In an incompatible manner; inconsistently; incongruously.
  • MISCOMPUTATION
    Erroneous computation; false reckoning.

 

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