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Word Meanings - WRETCHED - Book Publishers vocabulary database

1. Very miserable; sunk in, or accompanied by, deep affliction or distress, as from want, anxiety, or grief; calamitous; woeful; very afflicting. "To what wretched state reserved!" Milton. O cruel! Death! to those you are more kind Than to the

Additional info about word: WRETCHED

1. Very miserable; sunk in, or accompanied by, deep affliction or distress, as from want, anxiety, or grief; calamitous; woeful; very afflicting. "To what wretched state reserved!" Milton. O cruel! Death! to those you are more kind Than to the wretched mortals left behind. Waller. The wretched refuse of your teeming shore . . . 2. Worthless; paltry; very poor or mean; miserable; as, a wretched poem; a wretched cabin. 3. Hatefully contemptible; despicable; wicked. "Wretched ungratefulness." Sir P. Sidney. Nero reigned after this Claudius, of all men wretchedest, ready to all manner vices. Capgrave.

Possible synonyms: (Same meaning words of WRETCHED)

Possible antonyms: (opposite words of WRETCHED)

Related words: (words related to WRETCHED)

  • STINTLESS
    Without stint or restraint. The stintlesstears of old Heraclitus. Marston.
  • FAINT
    feint, false, faint, F. feint, p.p. of feindre to feign, suppose, 1. Lacking strength; weak; languid; inclined to swoon; as, faint with fatigue, hunger, or thirst. 2. Wanting in courage, spirit, or energy; timorous; cowardly; dejected; depressed;
  • SQUALIDLY
    In a squalid manner.
  • DESERTER
    One who forsakes a duty, a cause or a party, a friend, or any one to whom he owes service; especially, a soldier or a seaman who abandons the service without leave; one guilty of desertion.
  • SORDIDNESS
    The quality or state of being sordid.
  • FRAILNESS
    Frailty.
  • DESOLATE
    1. Destitute or deprived of inhabitants; deserted; uninhabited; hence, gloomy; as, a desolate isle; a desolate wilderness; a desolate house. I will make Jerusalem . . . a den of dragons, and I will make the cities of Judah desolate, without an
  • FRAIL
    A basket made of rushes, used chiefly for containing figs and raisins. 2. The quantity of raisins -- about thirty-two, fifty-six, or seventy-five pounds, -- contained in a frail. 3. A rush for weaving baskets. Johnson.
  • HAPLESS
    Without hap or luck; luckless; unfortunate; unlucky; unhappy; as, hapless youth; hapless maid. Dryden.
  • CRINGLE
    An iron or pope thimble or grommet worked into or attached to the edges and corners of a sail; -- usually in the plural. The cringles are used for making fast the bowline bridles, earings, etc. (more info) 1. A withe for fastening a gate.
  • ILLIBERALISM
    Illiberality.
  • ENERVATION
    1. The act of weakening, or reducing strength. 2. The state of being weakened; effeminacy. Bacon.
  • MISERABLENESS
    The state or quality of being miserable.
  • ABJECT
    1. Cast down; low-lying. From the safe shore their floating carcasses And broken chariot wheels; so thick bestrown Abject and lost lay these, covering the flood. Milton. 2. Sunk to a law condition; down in spirit or hope; degraded; servile;
  • PEOPLE
    1. The body of persons who compose a community, tribe, nation, or race; an aggregate of individuals forming a whole; a community; a nation. Unto him shall the gathering of the people be. Gen. xlix. 10. The ants are a people not strong. Prov. xxx.
  • FAWNINGLY
    In a fawning manner.
  • SERVILELY
    In a servile manner; slavishly.
  • MISERABLE
    1. Very unhappy; wretched. What hopes delude thee, miserable man Dryden. 2. Causing unhappiness or misery. What 's more miserable than discontent Shak. 3. Worthless; mean; despicable; as, a miserable fellow; a miserable dinner. Miserable comforters
  • SQUALIDNESS
    Quality or state of being squalid.
  • PLANTIGRADA
    A subdivision of Carnivora having plantigrade feet. It includes the bears, raccoons, and allied species.
  • DISPLANTATION
    The act of displanting; removal; displacement. Sir W. Raleigh.
  • SUPPLANT
    heels, to throw down; sub under + planta the sole of the foot, also, 1. To trip up. "Supplanted, down he fell." Milton. 2. To remove or displace by stratagem; to displace and take the place of; to supersede; as, a rival supplants another in the
  • INDESERT
    Ill desert. Addison.
  • CORUSCANT
    Glittering in flashes; flashing. Howell.
  • TAFFRAIL
    The upper part of a ship's stern, which is flat like a table on the top, and sometimes ornamented with carved work; the rail around a ship's stern.
  • MISDESERT
    Ill desert. Spenser.

 

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